Thursday, March 9, 2017

Reflective Roof Coatings FAQs

Ever had questions about roof coatings?  Here are some answers from the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA):

 
 
 

Reflective Coatings FAQs

Why should I get my roof coated with a reflective coating?

Coating will extend the life of the roof, by reducing heat transfer into the building, decreasing thermal shock (thermal expansion and contraction of the roof membrane), and helping to mitigate leaks. Reflective coatings also can reduce heat energy costs and improve the aesthetics of the roof.

What kind of roofs can be coated?

Almost all types of roofs can be coated. Some examples include metal, spray polyurethane, single-ply, modified bitumen, Built-up roof (BUR) systems, etc. Without special treatments, ballasted and gravel surfaced membranes are not typically acceptable roof surfaces for coating membranes.

What types of reflective coatings are available in the market?

There are several types of reflective roof coatings that impart varied reflectance rates/ values. Typically, the reflective coatings are what are commonly referred to as white coatings and there are also aluminum coatings typically used with asphalt. Highly reflective white roof coatings are typically comprised of acrylics, urethanes, silicones, SBS, SEBS, and other types.

How is the coating applied?

The coating can be applied using spray, roller or brush.

Do I need a primer?

A primer is no substitute for thorough cleaning. However, sometimes primers are required, depending on substrate and type of coating. Refer to your coating manufacturer for specific requirements.

How much coating should be put on the roof?

This depends on the coating manufacturer and the project specifications. When in doubt, consult the coating manufacturer you are working with.

How do I prepare the roof surface for coating?

The roof must be thoroughly cleaned, and allowed to dry thoroughly. This is a critical step to ensure a successful coating application. Be careful not to damage the lap seams. Care should be taken when pressure washing not to disturb the integrity of the underlying roof membrane particularly where there are adhered seams. Refer to the specific coating manufacturer you are using for their specific requirements for roof preparation.

Should I coat a new roof or nearly new roof?

Yes, a new roof should be coated if the building owner wants to add a highly reflective roof coating to reduce energy costs. The buyer should be aware of any warranties provided for a new roof that may violate that warranty during the period it is in force via the use of a roof coating. This will extend the roof’s service life. A reflective roof coating will reduce the heat load on the roofing assembly.
 
 

What are the energy savings?

This depends on the geographic location, insulation, and cost of electricity. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), and several roofing material manufacturers have computer programs that can estimate the savings. A growing number of energy consultants are available to provide environmental regulation compliance information.

Will a reflective coating extend the life of my roof?

Yes. The coating becomes the first layer of UV and waterproofing protection for the roof, and helps reduce expansion and contraction (thermal shock) of the roof.

Are there any warranties available?

Yes. Coating manufacturers offer different types of warranties depending on your needs and applications.

How long will the coating last?

Based on long-term histories, typically the roof life of a properly applied roof coating can be extended up to 10 years or more. Performance can vary depending on type and conditions, as well as the coating film thickness.

Can the roof be recoated in the future?

Yes. As the coating wears away, additional coating can be applied. Most coatings systems are renewable and sustainable. Refer to the specific coating manufacturer you are using for their specific requirements on re-coating applications.

Do I need a contractor, or can I do it myself?

The coating can be applied by a properly trained building owner or by an experienced roof coatings applicator. However, a roofing contractor is strongly recommended if there are such issues as existing leaks, wet insulation, damaged deck, or manufacturers’ warranties.

Can a coating stand up in ponding water conditions?

That depends on the coating. All roofs should be designed and built to have positive drainage and not allow ponding water. Some coatings are designed to withstand ponding conditions; however, not all coatings will withstand these conditions. Check with your manufacturer to see if your coating can withstand ponding water conditions.

In what weather conditions can the coating be applied?

For water borne coatings, the ambient air temperature should be 50oF (10oC) and rising, with no rain for the next 24 hours. Solvent borne coatings can be applied in colder weather. As always, check with the coating manufacturer.

How long does the coating take to dry/cure?

That depends on many factors: air temperature, wind, roof surface temperature, relative humidity (water borne coatings) coating color and the type of coating applied. For example, some coatings are moisture cured and thus humidity assists in its curing process.
 
 

Can I coat a rusted metal roof?

Rusted metal roofs can be coated after the rust conditions have been addressed. If the roof is “white rust” (zinc or aluminum) it can be coated after cleaning. If the roof is “red rust” the rust must be removed or treated with a corrosion inhibiting primer. All rusted fasteners should be treated or replaced.

What is ENERGY STAR?

ENERGY STAR is a US Government sponsored program encouraging the use of energy efficient products. Roofing materials including coatings can qualify for ENERGY STAR if the coating meets specific solar reflectance minimum criteria.

What is the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC)?

The Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) is an independent, non-profit organization that maintains a third-party rating system for radiative properties of roof surfacing materials.

Is there a tax advantage or rebate program available?

Some states, municipalities and utilities have programs. Check with your coatings manufacturer for further information. As a membership benefit, RCMA provides maintains a database of current information on rebates and tax credits for installing reflective roofs. RCMA’s customized search tool can be used to find the most up-to-date listings of reflective roofing financial incentives available.
Roof coatings are typically classified as maintenance, and in many cases can be written off as such in the same calendar year in which the coating application is completed; check with your CFO for specific details on roof maintenance tax deductions.

How do I maintain the coating?

It is recommended that the roof, including the coating, be inspected semi-annually and after a major storm or high wind “event”. Additional coating may need to be applied to repair damage to the coating and underlying roofing substrate. Check with the manufacturer and/or warranty program requirements.

What are Solar Reflectance and Thermal Emittance?

Solar Reflectance is a measure of the ability of a material (roof coating) to reflect the sun’s radiation. Thermal Emittance is a measure of the material (roof coating) to release trapped heat back into the atmosphere.

Will the coating stop my leaks?

While coatings may potentially stop minor leaks, the roof should be properly repaired and dried prior to coating application. Coatings may be able to seal pinhole leaks, which are leaks not visible to the naked eye. If the roof is leaking, the roof leak will need to be identified and repaired prior to any recoating; do not expect the coating to find and seal the leaks.

Where do I find a contractor to coat my roof?

Check with the coating manufacturer who may be able to suggest applicators who have used their products and have familiarity with the application. Another option would be to interview contractors and ask specific questions about their proven ability to install roof coatings. Contractors affiliated with the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) or local roofing contractor trade associations typically are more knowledgeable. Consult those groups’ websites for contractors.
 
Original article can be found here: https://www.roofcoatings.org/reflective-roof-coatings-institute/solar-reflective-coatings-faqs/

If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.
To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.
The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001
Serving Phoenix, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Scottsdale
 

Monday, March 6, 2017

The Importance of Roof Ventilation

 

This is a great article about roof ventilation found on the GAF website:

Poor Attic Ventilation Can Ruin Your Insulation, Destroy Your Shingles, And Potentially Raise Your Energy Bills!

Proper Attic Ventilation
Proper attic ventilation systems allow a continual flow of outside air through the attic, protecting the efficiency of the insulation and helping to lower temperatures in the living space.
It consists of a balance between air intake (at your eaves or soffits) and air exhaust (at or near your roof ridge).
The U.S. FHA (Federal Housing Administration) recommends a minimum of at least 1 square foot of attic ventilation (both intake and exhaust) for every 300 square feet of attic space. For example, if your attic is 900 square feet, you need a total of 3 square feet of ventilation. This amount should be divided equally between intake and exhaust ventilation (i.e., 1 1/2 feet of each) to insure proper air flow through the attic. To calculate the amount of ventilation you need for your home, visit GAF's Ventilation Calculator .
Why Take Risks?
Many homes in North America do not have proper attic ventilation. Why? Because most people are unaware that attic ventilation can impact the longevity of their entire home!--
In the summer, improper ventilation can cause attic heat to build in excess of 160°F. This super-heated air eventually penetrates the ceiling insulation into the living area below.
Types of damage that can result include:
  • Premature aging of your roofing system ("fried" shingles)
  • Warping, cracking, or breaking down of wood framing
  • Damage to siding, exterior or interior paint, and wallpaper
A properly ventilated attic can help reduce the load on your air conditioner by moving the super-heated air out of your attic before it builds up and causes damage. 

In the winter, various household appliances, bathtubs, showers, and cooking vapors can contribute to excess moisture build-up. Improperly ventilated attics will allow this moisture to collect and cling to the underside of the roof. The moisture will condense and fall, soaking the attic insulation and reducing its efficiency.
Additional structural damage can include:
  • Roof deck warping and rotting of the wood frame
  • Mildew growth
  • Buckling of shingles and felt
Finally, attics should be properly ventilated to help prevent ice dams in cold northern climates. During the winter, ice and snow on a roof will melt and run down the deck to the cooler eaves. This run-off can re-freeze, creating an ice dam that may force water back up under the shingles and leak into your home — causing hundreds or thousands of dollars of damage to your ceilings and walls. Adequate attic ventilation reduces the amount of initial melting that occurs on your roof, thereby reducing the chance that ice dams will form.
 
 
If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.
To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.
The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001
Serving Phoenix, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Scottsdale

Friday, February 3, 2017

Elastomeric Roof Coating Project in Photos

Roof coating project over a Built-Up Roof System (BUR) in Apache Junction, AZ.  
 
Completed on February 3, 2017 by The Roof Medics.
 
The first set of photos are the BEFORE photos showing the general condition of the roof:
 
 
  
 
 
The second set of photos shows the priming & coating step: 
  
  
 
 
The last set of photos shows the finished roof: 
 
  
 
  
 
If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.
To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.
The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001
Serving Phoenix, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Scottsdale

Self-Adhering Bituminous Roofing Membranes






This is an excerpt from a good article written about Bituminous Roofing Membranes:









The ancient Mesopotamians had it right when they began using asphalt to waterproof temple baths and water tanks. The Phoenicians later found asphalt useful in caulking the seams of their merchant ships. And when they needed to seal their baths, reservoirs, and aqueducts, guess what substance the Romans relied on? Thousands of years later, asphalt has a proven track record documenting its ability to resist water penetration. 

The ancient Mesopotamians had it right when they began using asphalt to waterproof temple baths and water tanks. The Phoenicians later found asphalt useful in caulking the seams of their merchant ships. And when they needed to seal their baths, reservoirs, and aqueducts, guess what substance the Romans relied on? Thousands of years later, asphalt has a proven track record documenting its ability to resist water penetration. 







The premise has remained the same, but the technology has changed. In the past decade, major advances have been made in asphalt roofing. Modified bituminous roof membranes, for example, have emerged as a popular option for low-sloped roofs. 





Asphalt used in manufacturing modified bitumen systems is generally modified with one of two materials: atactic polypropylene (APP) or styrene butadiene styrene (SBS). These modifiers create a uniform matrix that enhances the physical properties of the asphalt. 



When added to asphalt, APP gives the substance plastic properties, creating greater elasticity and stretching the modified asphalt. Likewise, the SBS polymer soaks up asphalt like a sponge, fixes its shape and form, and imparts flexibility and resilience to the membrane. Thus, the membrane is self-sealing around nails. 



SBS-modified bitumen membranes resist water penetration while exhibiting superior elongation and recovery properties over a wide range of temperature extremes. This high-performance benefit makes them exceptionally durable, reliable and easy to maintain. 

Greatest of Ease

Add "versatile" to that list of attributes. Historically, modified bitumen membranes were torch-applied, mop-applied using hot asphalt or applied with solvent-based adhesives. Newer membranes combine the performance of proven modified bituminous compounds with a self-adhesive bituminous layer for ease of application. 



Constructed in a similar fashion to traditional modified bituminous materials, self-adhesive compounds comprise asphalt, polymers and fillers. Additionally, certain resins may be added to improve adhesion characteristics. The membranes are reinforced with fiberglass, polyester or a combination of the two. 



Among the advantages of self-adhesive membranes are safe and fast application through the use of highly engineered asphalts. Self-adhesive membranes also reduce the need for hot asphalt. In low-slope roofing, you can choose from a range of peel-and-stick self-adhesive products that have been used successfully on high-density, fume-sensitive occupancy type buildings such as health care facilities and schools. 



Based on their growing popularity, there is an ASTM International standard written to address self-adhesive membranes installed beneath exposed roofing materials (ASTM D1970, "Standard Specification for Self-Adhering Polymer Modified Bituminous Sheet Materials Used as Steep Roofing Underlayment for Ice Dam Protection.") In addition, standards are currently being developed to address APP and SBS based self-adhesive membranes in both low-slope and steep-slope applications. 

Residential Appeal

Self-adhering bituminous membranes are used in sloped roofing (greater than 2:12) as an underlayment to help prevent water entry from ice dams at the eave areas of shingled roofs in cold climates. Contractors and homeowners should always check local building codes to confirm eave protection requirements. 



Typically, these membranes are installed from the eaves edge to a point at least 24 inches inside the exterior wall line of the building, beneath the finished shingle layers. The adhesive asphalt component effectively seals the membrane to itself, and around the shanks of nails used in overlying shingles, so that any water that is forced underneath the shingle layers by wind or ice dams does not reach the deck or attic space below. 



Self-adhesive underlayment membranes can also be used as part of a flashing system in valleys or around roof penetrations (skylights, vent stacks, etc.), and are commonly applied beneath roofing materials on lower sloped roofs (2:12 to 4:12). 



In lower-sloped residential roofs (2:12 to 4:12), homeowners and roofing contractors can also apply the underlayment membrane over the entire roof area, to protect the roof should water get underneath the shingle layer. Some self-adhering membranes are actually designed to be applied as exposed roof coverings, and are covered with colored granules, similar to asphalt shingles. When installed, these membranes form a strong vapor seal over the attic. 



Some builders have found this type of membrane to be so durable that it can remain exposed on the roof longer than other membranes (in some cases days or even weeks), allowing them time to get back to the job at hand. 



Whether the membrane is exposed or not, moist air entering the attic from the heated living space below can be trapped beneath the membrane-covered roof deck and condense. Serious problems such as wood rot, mold development and water staining can occur. 



To avoid condensation problems, the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends installing sufficient insulation, covering the entire attic floor to reduce heat migration into the attic. Homeowners and contractors should consider installing a continuous vapor retarder on the floor of the attic, beneath the insulation. Adequate through-ventilation should be installed to ensure sufficient airflow through the attic cavity. 

The entire original article was written by Reed Hitchcock and can be found here.

If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.

To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.

The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001
Serving the Phoenix Metro Area, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Scottsdale, Glendale





Monday, January 30, 2017

Roof Certifications

So, You Need A Roof Certification

Roof Certifications are usually required by a mortgage company during a real estate transaction.  A home inpector or home appraiser has raised concerns about a roof and the lender wants assurance that the roof will not be a problem for the new homeowner (or the lender themselves).  Roof Certifications are warranties that roofing contractors issue on a roof that assure a third party that there are no defects.  Here is where the roofing contractor comes in.  A roof certification means a roofing contractor is issuing a warranty on a roof that he did not install.

Not all roofs will get a roof certification.  A roof certification starts with a history of the roof followed by an inspection then followed by any repairs needed.  There are many factors that go into approving a roof certification.  The age of the roof is a big factor.  Leak or repair history is a big component.  The roofing contractor who is asked to certify a roof he did not install is looking at future liability.  There are usually repairs needed to get a roof up to a certifiable level.  This is an additional cost to the cost of the roof certification.

Don’t let your roof be victim to the “out of sight, out of mind” attitude that we are all accustomed to.
If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.

To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.

The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001
Serving the Phoenix Metro Area, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Scottsdale, Glendale

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Roof Inspections

Inspecting Your Roof to Get Ahead of Problems

Protect Your Investment With A Roof Inspection

How do you know what is going on your roof?  Most people have no idea what is going on up there.  As a contractor, we are constantly surprised by what we find on roofs and sometimes the amount of it, like debris, toys, tools, bird poop, old roofing material, toys, clothes, rocks, bottles and water.
Your roof protects you from the elements, but do you protect your roof?  Start by inspecting it at least once per year (especially right before the harsh Arizona Monsoon Season).  By checking out your roof you will help it last longer, promote drainage and see what condition it is in and what repairs, if any, need to be completed.
Should you do a roof inspection yourself?  The quick answer is "No."  Most people have no business getting on a roof as they are not used to climbing a ladder, navigating parapet walls and walking on a pitched roof.  Roofers are the best option to have walking on your roof - this is what they do.  They also know what makes up a roof, how roofs are installed and what to look at for existing or potential roof problems.  No matter what, safety is key.  If you do not feel safe doing it - DON'T!  Get a professional to do it.
A roof inspection will consist of climbing up/down a ladder, walking the roof (although there are some roofs not suitable for walking), noticing existing roof problems or potential roof problems, taking photos, and taking measurements as needed.  A typical roof inspection should take between 10-60 minutes per roof depending on size and type of roof.  Residential roofs are typically smaller than commercial roofs thus taking a shorter time.

Don’t let your roof be victim to the “out of sight, out of mind” attitude that we are all accustomed to.

If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.
To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.
The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001
Serving Phoenix, Mesa, Gilbert, Chandler, Tempe, Scottsdale

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Roof Drains and Proper Drainage

 
 

Roof drainage is one of the most important aspect of roofing.  The longer water is on your roof, the longer it has to find a way through your roof system.

 
There are different kinds of roof drainage systems.  The most common are eaves (open edges of your roof), roof scuppers (holes through walls), and roof drains (holes through the roof into drainage pipes).  Roof scuppers and roof drains need the most attention because they are more likely to clog and interfere with water draining off of the roof.

Simple steps can be taken to help keep water flowing off of your roof instead of into your house or building.  Routine maintenance and cleaning, including removal of trash and debris with emphasis on keeping the scuppers and drains cleared.  We always recommend cleaning at least once per year, preferably before the monsoon season. 





Don't let your roof be victim to the "out of sight, out of mind" attitude that we are all accustomed to.

If you have a roof issue, we are the professional roofers you’ve been looking for.  We are honest and professional and take our jobs very seriously.  We look to provide you the customer service you don’t expect from our industry.

To set an appointment for someone to come and look at your roof problem, please call 480-284-7338 or click here.

The Roof Medics – Roof Repair and Roof Replacement Specialists – Residential & Commericial Licensed, Bonded, Insured  – AZ ROC CR42 License #256001